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Architecture and Home Design | Sky Terra Design by Joanna Borek-Clement Architecture, in Tokyo, Japan

October 21, 2017 By: Jason Marie Category: Без рубрики

Sky Terra is designed by Joanna Borek-Clement Architecture, located in Tokyo, Japan.
Sky-Terra, elevated 1,600 ft above ground, is a proposed new level for the city with plazas formed by the roofs of individual skyscraper building units joining and structurally supporting each other. This system also allows for their narrow bases and slim profiles. The building itself becomes a modular element that can be reconfigured in a variety of urban mega-structure patterns with the potential to be implemented in any existing metropolitan environment.

Each building unit consists of three elements: a core supporting vertical circulation, office space that is wrapped by structural ‘fins’, and the plaza. The fins also act as the main support structure for the plaza level. They are designed to be a continuous structure anchored to deep foundations underground for stability. The buildings are designed with floors that increase in size with the height of the building, thus maximizing the highest value office space. The core of the building has a system of elevators and additionally two separate escalators that serve only the plaza level.

The concept offers the opportunity to create city parks, or to host public buildings such as the Sky-Terra Pools & Baths and the Sky-Terra Amphitheater. The plaza level reclaims rainwater and uses it for landscaping irrigation. Every square inch of space at plaza level that is not a pathway or road is designated as landscaping creating an unconventional green oasis in a conventional urban sprawl.

Created for the eVolo 2009 competition, this conceptual design was conceived to give space for outdoor activities in conventionally hyper-dense urban locations. In the ‘micro’ scale, Sky-Terra was inspired by neuron cells that create a symbiotic system in which each cell depends on as well as sustains another cell. In the ‘macro’ scale, Sky-Terra was inspired by the structural column system typically seen in buildings.

  • Harpa Apartment, Contemporary Apartment Design by Johannsen and Associates

  • Crescent House Design by Make Architects

  • Transbay Transit Termina, New Transit Terminal Design by Pelli Clarke Pelli, in San Francisco, United States

Architecture and Home Design | Freshen house with green garden

February 07, 2017 By: Jason Marie Category: Без рубрики

The presence of garden around the home can be a relaxing place for residents of the house. Parks can make a house look more cool, beautiful and comfortable. Moreover, in urban areas are rife with construction of a house or building, the less green areas that still exist. Coupled with a high activity level and air pollution from vehicle fumes, presence of garden in urban area can become oasis for release tired every day. And then what should be considered when going to create a garden?


In making a garden, there are a few things to note for the park created looks beautiful and orderly. Here are some things to consider when you will create a garden.

Set Theme Parks
The selected theme should be adjusted with an area of park land. If the area is not too large, you should choose a more simple themes, such as a minimalist theme that little detail in design. Once the theme is determined, you can choose the plants, flowers or other ornaments that supports the theme park.

Prepare for Installation of Parks and Land Create installation first. Installation and positioning of electricity and water must be considered to exist in a safe place and do not interfere with the activity while in the garden. Installation of electricity and water in particular need attention if you intend to create a pool with a water fountain.

Prepare land. As the planting medium, which will be used as park land must be cleaned of plant pests or weeds. Land also needs to be processed and can be cultivated for crops to flourish. Continued…

  • Tips for Freshen house with green garden – part 2

Architecture and Home Design | support structure

February 07, 2017 By: Jason Marie Category: Без рубрики

Sky Terra is designed by Joanna Borek-Clement Architecture, located in Tokyo, Japan.
Sky-Terra, elevated 1,600 ft above ground, is a proposed new level for the city with plazas formed by the roofs of individual skyscraper building units joining and structurally supporting each other. This system also allows for their narrow bases and slim profiles. The building itself becomes a modular element that can be reconfigured in a variety of urban mega-structure patterns with the potential to be implemented in any existing metropolitan environment.

Each building unit consists of three elements: a core supporting vertical circulation, office space that is wrapped by structural ‘fins’, and the plaza. The fins also act as the main support structure for the plaza level. They are designed to be a continuous structure anchored to deep foundations underground for stability. The buildings are designed with floors that increase in size with the height of the building, thus maximizing the highest value office space. The core of the building has a system of elevators and additionally two separate escalators that serve only the plaza level.

The concept offers the opportunity to create city parks, or to host public buildings such as the Sky-Terra Pools & Baths and the Sky-Terra Amphitheater. The plaza level reclaims rainwater and uses it for landscaping irrigation. Every square inch of space at plaza level that is not a pathway or road is designated as landscaping creating an unconventional green oasis in a conventional urban sprawl.

Created for the eVolo 2009 competition, this conceptual design was conceived to give space for outdoor activities in conventionally hyper-dense urban locations. In the ‘micro’ scale, Sky-Terra was inspired by neuron cells that create a symbiotic system in which each cell depends on as well as sustains another cell. In the ‘macro’ scale, Sky-Terra was inspired by the structural column system typically seen in buildings.

Tips to Reduce global warming by creating green garden | Architecture and Home Design

October 16, 2013 By: Jason Marie Category: Без рубрики

This is continuation of our previous post about Freshen house with green garden. In making a garden, there are some things to note for the park created looks beautiful and orderly. Here are some things to watch when we are going to make a garden.
Set Theme Parks
Determine theme park before determining which plants will be purchased, the theme park should adjust with available land. After the theme is determined, we can selecting plants, flowers or other ornaments that support our theme park.


Prepare Park’s Installation and Land
Installation and positioning of electricity and water must be considered to exist in a safe place and do not interfere with the activity while in the garden. Prepare the land, as planting media, which will be used as park land must be cleaned of plant pests or weeds. Land also needs to be processed and can be cultivated for crops to flourish.

Create Harmonization Plants
To make park look more attractive, select vary plants. Choose plants of different sizes, types, or colors so that the park is not monotonous.

Park’s Material Selection Park does not only consist of plants alone. Beautiful garden should also be supported by hard objects such as potted plants, ponds, rocks, sand, or other supporting object is often called hardscape.

We can also add garden chair, swing or anything else to add comfort while in the garden. After determining the model of the park, use softscape and hardscape will be more easily determined.

Plant Selection
Select the type of plants in accordance with the conditions of our homes. Want to indoor or outdoor garden. The location of the house in cold regions or in hot areas. This effect with plant growth.

Lighting
To add to beauty of the park, additional lighting in the garden becomes necessary. For example by installing garden lighting or spotlights that exploits a plant garden as its focus. The lights are very influential in the evening, so at night we can still enjoy the beauty of our garden with a romantic atmosphere.

The presence of the park can be important especially in the midst of the global warming issue. Parks can help reduce air pollution, reduce heat and increase the supply of oxygen so that we can enjoy the fresh air.

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  • Freshen house with green garden

2009 July | Architecture and Home Design – Part 4

March 20, 2012 By: Jason Marie Category: Без рубрики

Centara Grand and Bangkok Convention Centre is designed by BBG-BBGM Architect, located at CentralWorld Plaza, Bangkok, Thailand
The iconic hotel tower soars high above the podium to take its place as a landmark building in the Bangkok skyline. The mass of the podium is a succession of concentric circles layered around the tower shaft. The glass and metal cylinder rises directly from the street to a height of approximately 210 meters. Its architectural expression consists of an arrangement of horizontal banding overlaid onto a strong vertical framework. Dynamism and the play of transparency versus solidity are the hallmarks of the overall design. These elements combine to create a building whose lightness belies its large mass.

The architecture at the top of the tower unfolds into a dramatic outer shell, culminating in two elongated arches inspired by a young lotus flower blooming high above the water. The graceful architectural gesture evokes the harmony born out of disorder and will become an immediate urban landmark.


(more…)

Sky Terra is designed by Joanna Borek-Clement Architecture, located in Tokyo, Japan.
Sky-Terra, elevated 1,600 ft above ground, is a proposed new level for the city with plazas formed by the roofs of individual skyscraper building units joining and structurally supporting each other. This system also allows for their narrow bases and slim profiles. The building itself becomes a modular element that can be reconfigured in a variety of urban mega-structure patterns with the potential to be implemented in any existing metropolitan environment.

Each building unit consists of three elements: a core supporting vertical circulation, office space that is wrapped by structural ‘fins’, and the plaza. The fins also act as the main support structure for the plaza level. They are designed to be a continuous structure anchored to deep foundations underground for stability. The buildings are designed with floors that increase in size with the height of the building, thus maximizing the highest value office space. The core of the building has a system of elevators and additionally two separate escalators that serve only the plaza level.

The concept offers the opportunity to create city parks, or to host public buildings such as the Sky-Terra Pools & Baths and the Sky-Terra Amphitheater. The plaza level reclaims rainwater and uses it for landscaping irrigation. Every square inch of space at plaza level that is not a pathway or road is designated as landscaping creating an unconventional green oasis in a conventional urban sprawl.

Created for the eVolo 2009 competition, this conceptual design was conceived to give space for outdoor activities in conventionally hyper-dense urban locations. In the ‘micro’ scale, Sky-Terra was inspired by neuron cells that create a symbiotic system in which each cell depends on as well as sustains another cell. In the ‘macro’ scale, Sky-Terra was inspired by the structural column system typically seen in buildings.

Public Academy is designed by RMJM Architect, located in Suzhou, China.
The province of Jiangsu, in which Suzhou is located, has the largest number of higher education institutions in the country with 105 universities and colleges and an annual enrolment of around a million students. The Public Academy is RMJM’s first full higher education campus in China and the first project to come out of its Global Education Studio, launched last year.

Peter Morrison, RMJM’s Chief Executive, said: “Over the last year or so, we have restructured our business by pooling the talent of our international experts in the growth areas of education, health, science and transportation. This strategy is clearly paying off and this is a big win for our specialist education team. It’s also a very exciting project for us to work on as the Public Academy will uncover China’s next generation of entrepreneurs and enhance Suzhou’s economic and educational reputation.”

The client’s brief called for an academy located in the higher education district of Suzhou, within the city’s successful industrial park that aims to be a leader in technology and R&D for high-tech industries. The 120,000 sq m campus design is contemporary, whilst also in keeping with the physical environment and social culture of Suzhou, which is celebrated for its meticulously designed walled gardens, canal-ordered townscape and traditional visual and literary arts.
(more…)

This Corten House is designed by Studio MK27, located in São Paulo, Brazil.
The front facade is made of Corten weathering steel. The dialogue between the rusty texture on the outside and the stone, wood, white mortar and the glass build the space. In the ground floor, there is ample room with a ceiling height of 5.2m and four folding doors that completely open out to the deck and external fireplace; in the living room, a free wooden volume houses the kitchen and utilities program. The three bedrooms are located in the second floor.

On the rooftop of the house, there is a wooden deck. This space functions as a sun deck with a heated pool and a view of the city of São Paulo.
Casa Corten is an urban house located near the largest park in the city of São Paulo, Brazil. The site is long and narrow, and its residents, make use of the rooftop and, especially, the park itself for leisure.

Being located at the fast emerging central suburb of Mumbai – Vikhroli, this property is at the heart of a dynamically evolving city. Of the six A-type towers, four towers already completed and occupied, the four B-type towers are set for construction this year. Most rooms overlook the scenic landscape of the verdant mangrove stretch and the distant hills of Ahmedabad in India. The property is judiciously embellished with amenities selected to serve aesthetic and practical concerns, keeping contemporary living standards in mind. The residential towers are earthquake-resistant, constructed using computerized ready-mix concrete and corrosion-resistant steel reinforcement.

Godrej Garden City is a 10 tower project comprised of 20 storey skyscrapers and above. Recently supported by the Clinton Climate Initiative’s Climate Positive Development Program, the project has been chosen as one which demonstrates urban growth in a ‘climate positive’ way.

Vertical Circulation | Architecture and Home Design

December 20, 2011 By: Jason Marie Category: Без рубрики

Sky Terra is designed by Joanna Borek-Clement Architecture, located in Tokyo, Japan.
Sky-Terra, elevated 1,600 ft above ground, is a proposed new level for the city with plazas formed by the roofs of individual skyscraper building units joining and structurally supporting each other. This system also allows for their narrow bases and slim profiles. The building itself becomes a modular element that can be reconfigured in a variety of urban mega-structure patterns with the potential to be implemented in any existing metropolitan environment.

Each building unit consists of three elements: a core supporting vertical circulation, office space that is wrapped by structural ‘fins’, and the plaza. The fins also act as the main support structure for the plaza level. They are designed to be a continuous structure anchored to deep foundations underground for stability. The buildings are designed with floors that increase in size with the height of the building, thus maximizing the highest value office space. The core of the building has a system of elevators and additionally two separate escalators that serve only the plaza level.

The concept offers the opportunity to create city parks, or to host public buildings such as the Sky-Terra Pools & Baths and the Sky-Terra Amphitheater. The plaza level reclaims rainwater and uses it for landscaping irrigation. Every square inch of space at plaza level that is not a pathway or road is designated as landscaping creating an unconventional green oasis in a conventional urban sprawl.

Created for the eVolo 2009 competition, this conceptual design was conceived to give space for outdoor activities in conventionally hyper-dense urban locations. In the ‘micro’ scale, Sky-Terra was inspired by neuron cells that create a symbiotic system in which each cell depends on as well as sustains another cell. In the ‘macro’ scale, Sky-Terra was inspired by the structural column system typically seen in buildings.

Tokyo Japan | Architecture and Home Design

September 09, 2010 By: Jason Marie Category: Без рубрики

Sky Terra is designed by Joanna Borek-Clement Architecture, located in Tokyo, Japan.
Sky-Terra, elevated 1,600 ft above ground, is a proposed new level for the city with plazas formed by the roofs of individual skyscraper building units joining and structurally supporting each other. This system also allows for their narrow bases and slim profiles. The building itself becomes a modular element that can be reconfigured in a variety of urban mega-structure patterns with the potential to be implemented in any existing metropolitan environment.

Each building unit consists of three elements: a core supporting vertical circulation, office space that is wrapped by structural ‘fins’, and the plaza. The fins also act as the main support structure for the plaza level. They are designed to be a continuous structure anchored to deep foundations underground for stability. The buildings are designed with floors that increase in size with the height of the building, thus maximizing the highest value office space. The core of the building has a system of elevators and additionally two separate escalators that serve only the plaza level.

The concept offers the opportunity to create city parks, or to host public buildings such as the Sky-Terra Pools & Baths and the Sky-Terra Amphitheater. The plaza level reclaims rainwater and uses it for landscaping irrigation. Every square inch of space at plaza level that is not a pathway or road is designated as landscaping creating an unconventional green oasis in a conventional urban sprawl.

Created for the eVolo 2009 competition, this conceptual design was conceived to give space for outdoor activities in conventionally hyper-dense urban locations. In the ‘micro’ scale, Sky-Terra was inspired by neuron cells that create a symbiotic system in which each cell depends on as well as sustains another cell. In the ‘macro’ scale, Sky-Terra was inspired by the structural column system typically seen in buildings.

Three Elements | Architecture and Home Design

September 09, 2010 By: Jason Marie Category: Без рубрики

Sky Terra is designed by Joanna Borek-Clement Architecture, located in Tokyo, Japan.
Sky-Terra, elevated 1,600 ft above ground, is a proposed new level for the city with plazas formed by the roofs of individual skyscraper building units joining and structurally supporting each other. This system also allows for their narrow bases and slim profiles. The building itself becomes a modular element that can be reconfigured in a variety of urban mega-structure patterns with the potential to be implemented in any existing metropolitan environment.

Each building unit consists of three elements: a core supporting vertical circulation, office space that is wrapped by structural ‘fins’, and the plaza. The fins also act as the main support structure for the plaza level. They are designed to be a continuous structure anchored to deep foundations underground for stability. The buildings are designed with floors that increase in size with the height of the building, thus maximizing the highest value office space. The core of the building has a system of elevators and additionally two separate escalators that serve only the plaza level.

The concept offers the opportunity to create city parks, or to host public buildings such as the Sky-Terra Pools & Baths and the Sky-Terra Amphitheater. The plaza level reclaims rainwater and uses it for landscaping irrigation. Every square inch of space at plaza level that is not a pathway or road is designated as landscaping creating an unconventional green oasis in a conventional urban sprawl.

Created for the eVolo 2009 competition, this conceptual design was conceived to give space for outdoor activities in conventionally hyper-dense urban locations. In the ‘micro’ scale, Sky-Terra was inspired by neuron cells that create a symbiotic system in which each cell depends on as well as sustains another cell. In the ‘macro’ scale, Sky-Terra was inspired by the structural column system typically seen in buildings.

Skyscraper Building | Architecture and Home Design

September 09, 2010 By: Jason Marie Category: Без рубрики

Sky Terra is designed by Joanna Borek-Clement Architecture, located in Tokyo, Japan.
Sky-Terra, elevated 1,600 ft above ground, is a proposed new level for the city with plazas formed by the roofs of individual skyscraper building units joining and structurally supporting each other. This system also allows for their narrow bases and slim profiles. The building itself becomes a modular element that can be reconfigured in a variety of urban mega-structure patterns with the potential to be implemented in any existing metropolitan environment.

Each building unit consists of three elements: a core supporting vertical circulation, office space that is wrapped by structural ‘fins’, and the plaza. The fins also act as the main support structure for the plaza level. They are designed to be a continuous structure anchored to deep foundations underground for stability. The buildings are designed with floors that increase in size with the height of the building, thus maximizing the highest value office space. The core of the building has a system of elevators and additionally two separate escalators that serve only the plaza level.

The concept offers the opportunity to create city parks, or to host public buildings such as the Sky-Terra Pools & Baths and the Sky-Terra Amphitheater. The plaza level reclaims rainwater and uses it for landscaping irrigation. Every square inch of space at plaza level that is not a pathway or road is designated as landscaping creating an unconventional green oasis in a conventional urban sprawl.

Created for the eVolo 2009 competition, this conceptual design was conceived to give space for outdoor activities in conventionally hyper-dense urban locations. In the ‘micro’ scale, Sky-Terra was inspired by neuron cells that create a symbiotic system in which each cell depends on as well as sustains another cell. In the ‘macro’ scale, Sky-Terra was inspired by the structural column system typically seen in buildings.

Micro Scale | Architecture and Home Design

September 09, 2010 By: Jason Marie Category: Без рубрики

Sky Terra is designed by Joanna Borek-Clement Architecture, located in Tokyo, Japan.
Sky-Terra, elevated 1,600 ft above ground, is a proposed new level for the city with plazas formed by the roofs of individual skyscraper building units joining and structurally supporting each other. This system also allows for their narrow bases and slim profiles. The building itself becomes a modular element that can be reconfigured in a variety of urban mega-structure patterns with the potential to be implemented in any existing metropolitan environment.

Each building unit consists of three elements: a core supporting vertical circulation, office space that is wrapped by structural ‘fins’, and the plaza. The fins also act as the main support structure for the plaza level. They are designed to be a continuous structure anchored to deep foundations underground for stability. The buildings are designed with floors that increase in size with the height of the building, thus maximizing the highest value office space. The core of the building has a system of elevators and additionally two separate escalators that serve only the plaza level.

The concept offers the opportunity to create city parks, or to host public buildings such as the Sky-Terra Pools & Baths and the Sky-Terra Amphitheater. The plaza level reclaims rainwater and uses it for landscaping irrigation. Every square inch of space at plaza level that is not a pathway or road is designated as landscaping creating an unconventional green oasis in a conventional urban sprawl.

Created for the eVolo 2009 competition, this conceptual design was conceived to give space for outdoor activities in conventionally hyper-dense urban locations. In the ‘micro’ scale, Sky-Terra was inspired by neuron cells that create a symbiotic system in which each cell depends on as well as sustains another cell. In the ‘macro’ scale, Sky-Terra was inspired by the structural column system typically seen in buildings.